PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT

Ring care 101

Photo by Bradly J. Boner

Words by Rebecca Mitchell

Your wedding rings, perhaps the most important jewelry you will ever own, are both symbols of everlasting love and tangible reminders of your wedding vows. Since you will likely wear your rings every day for the rest of your life, you will want to know how to care for them to keep them looking brand new for years to come.

With special care and treatment, your wedding rings can remain as stunningly beautiful as the day you exchanged them.

Clean them
Cleaning your wedding rings is quite simple. Jewelry experts suggest you soak rings in warm, soapy water for a few hours. Then, gently brush away any dirt or grime with a soft baby toothbrush. For best results, you should clean your rings every three weeks.

Avoid letting your rings come in contact with chlorine bleach or other harsh chemicals that can erode metal settings and dull finishes.

Insure them
Insure your wedding rings either by adding a rider onto your homeowner’s policy or by taking out a policy with a company specializing in jewelry insurance.

Wear them often, but not always
To reduce the risk of losing your rings, try to avoid taking them off every time you wash your hands. Instead, wear them as much as possible and enjoy their beauty and symbolism. But don’t wear your rings during rough activities or sports that present a high risk of loss, like swimming, where cool water can cause your fingers to temporarily shrink.

If you work in a profession that makes it hard to wear your rings regularly (firefighter, nurse, mechanic, etc.), consider buying an alternate ring, like a silicon one, and storing your real ring.

Store them properly
When you must take off your rings, store them in a lined jewelry case or cloth bag in a safe, memorable location. It’s best to pick a designated spot and make a habit of storing them there. Avoid leaving them near a sink where they can easily fall down the drain.

Service them
At least once a year (preferably twice), take your rings to a reputable jeweler to have the settings checked, loose ones repaired, and stones inspected, along with a professional cleaning.

Photo by Katy Gray

Photo by Heather Erson

Photo by Cody Downard

| Posted in Planning Your Wedding